Blog

  • WET WINTER WEATHER AND SNOW MOLD

    Posted by: admin

    During the winter if your lawn has extended periods of snow coverage it might develop a mold in between the layer of snow and the lawn. This is aptly named Snow Mold. There are two types of snow mold, pink and gray. Gray mold is the most common type of snow mold in Colorado.

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  • THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CRABGRASS AND TALL FESCUE: DEMYSTIFIED!

    Posted by: admin

    Every year, we get calls in the spring about crabgrass. We know that our customer’s cannot have crabgrass in their lawn in the spring in Colorado, since crabgrass is a warm-season annual grass that does not show up until mid-summer. All too often coarse tall fescues, and many other nuisance grasses, are incorrectly identified as crabgrass. The term “crabgrass” seems to be a universal catch-all for any ugly grass growing in a lawn that is unwanted. But they are very different!

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  • POWER RAKING: THE DO’S, DON’TS, AND FAQ!

    Posted by: admin

    A power rake seldom needs to be performed in a lawn; but this spring lawn care service in Boulder and Fort Collins can become very necessary in rare cases. If the thatch layer in the lawn is greater than ¾” or one inch, it is a candidate to be removed via power raking. 99%+ of lawns do not need a lawn de-thatching service. In fact a power rake can cause a lot of harm to a lawn if not done properly by a lawn care professional. If you think you need a power rake or de-thatching of your lawn, please continue reading before ordering this service.

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  • GRUBS: HOW TO IDENTIFY AND PREVENT THEM IN YOUR LAWN!

    Posted by: admin

    In rare occasions in Boulder, Fort Collins, and other Northern Front Range cities, we see wet conditions over the spring and summer that create a healthy environment for these grubs to thrive. However, our semi-arid climate typically makes for dry summer months with low humidity. Because of this, we rarely see grub damage in lawns unless they are being over-watered. Insect pressure from grubs, along with many other lawn care problems, can be prevented by practicing proper cultural practices, especially proper watering.

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  • HOW TO MEASURE THE DIAMETER BREAST HEIGHT OF A TREE

    Posted by: admin

    To reduce product waste and to give you an accurate price for insect treatment for your tree, we require that you measure the diameter breast height (DBH) of the tree prior to our arrival.

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  • IT’S ALIIIVE!: WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO HAVE A LIVING SOIL?

    Posted by: admin

    A soil with an active community of microbes in the soil is called a living soil. A microbe or microorganism that resides in the soil such as bacteria, fungus, protozoa, and amoeba contributes to this community. This sounds friendly but it’s a very competitive environment to survive in. If this gets out of balance you can see a disease show up in the lawn because one of the microbes has become dominant. Necrotic Ring Spot is one of the most common fungus issues that is found in a lawn.

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  • WHAT CAUSES LAWN THATCH ACCUMULATION?

    Posted by: admin

    Lawn thatch is composed of a tightly intermingled layer of stems, leaves and grass roots, which accumulates between the vegetation and the soil. Too much thatch increases the turf's susceptibility to lawn diseases, reduces its tolerance to drought, cold, and heat stress; and hinders the movement of air, water, fertilizers, and nutrients into the soil. In severe cases roots of the grass will not grow into the soil but only take root in the thatch layer making the turf susceptible to drought and heat stress.

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  • All You Need to Know: Ascochyta/Dollar Spot Leaf Blight

    Posted by: admin

    This lawn fungus is most commonly seen at the start of the summer when the weather changes from a cool damp spring to a hot and dry summer. This is when we start seeing sprinkler coverage issues, or improper watering practices manifested. Ascochyta and Dollar Spot are both symptoms of shallow grass roots which is often a caused by incorrect watering practices. One cause is watering frequently but for short intervals. This will keep the grass roots from growing deeply because they stay close to the surface where the water is. The other cause is by over watering which replaces the air in the soil so the grass roots stay close to the surface so they can breathe. The thing you want to most avoid is applying synthetic pesticides or fungicides to the lawn. Those will hinder more than help. They will kill beneficial microbes in the soil which help the lawn recover. Having a living soil or a healthy population of microbes is what keeps the soil a competitive environment so no one fungus or bacteria can take over.

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  • Summer Lawn and Tree Care Tips

    Posted by: admin

    If you are on one of our full season programs your lawn will have the nutrients it needs with proper organic fertilization and organic weed control; however, those are only one aspect to a great looking lawn. Your lawn will only look great if the lawn is also being watered and mowed properly. Below are some great summer lawn tips to help your lawn survive the dry Colorado heat.

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  • Spring Lawn and Tree Care Tips

    Posted by: admin

    Spring seems to be the time of year when everything happens at once. It is important to be proactive with the lawn and trees especially when using organic products because certain products like our pre-emergent weed control Synergy work best when applied in March. Proper cultural practices are a very important step in maintaining a healthy lawn. When we speak of cultural practices we are referring to proper mowing, deep and infrequent lawn watering, and proper organic fertilizing. In early March, mow the lawn to clean up the debris from the winter and then water the lawn deeply. This water will help promote early growth, which will reduces weeds and it will help get much needed water to the trees that are in the lawn.

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